HIV-positive participant in vaccine study passes virus to sexual partner during treatment interruption

HIV-positive participant in vaccine study passes virus to sexual partner during treatment interruption

An HIV-positive man transmitted HIV to his sexual partner after interrupting antiretroviral therapy as part of a research study into a therapeutic vaccine, French scientists reported in the Journal of Infectious Diseases last week. The case report underlines the importance of participants in cure and vaccine studies being made aware of this potential and of prescribing pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to their sexual partners.

The 59-year-old man had been diagnosed with HIV nine years earlier, in the primary infection phase. He began antiretroviral therapy immediately and had maintained an undetectable viral load until taking part in the study. He was well informed about HIV and was involved in HIV activism.

While the case took place over four years ago, it has only been reported now. The man was taking part in a randomised, placebo-controlled vaccine study (VR102/ANRS149-LIGHT). Study participants received injections of either an active therapeutic vaccine or a placebo between baseline and week 24 of the study, then interrupted antiretroviral treatment at week 36. Participants were able to resume antiretroviral treatment at week 48 (or before) if viral load rebound occurred.

Study participants were informed of the risk of sexual transmission and advised to use condoms during the treatment interruption. The man attended study visits with his sexual partner and these discussions were recorded in his medical notes.

One month after stopping antiretroviral therapy, his viral load rose to 2000 copies/m, reaching almost 16000 copies/ml at six weeks, with a spontaneous return to a plateau of 1000 copies/ml after two months. He did not report any notable symptoms.

Also one month after beginning the treatment interruption, his 44-year-old female partner had fever, joint pain and a skin rash – symptoms that are suggestive of acute (very recent) HIV infection. She was subsequently diagnosed with HIV and phylogenetic analysis showed that her viral strain was very similar to that of her partner.

The only sexual behaviour the couple reported to doctors was cunnilingus (not usually considered a risky act) on two or three occasions. However, the doctors note that it can’t be ruled out that they had other types of sex as well. Neither partners report having other sexual partners.

“This case highlights the risk of secondary transmission of HIV infection during treatment interruption, including among participants who have a good understanding of their HIV infection and its effects and whose level of viral rebound is low,” comment Professor Jean-Daniel Lelièvre and Dr Laurent Hocqueloux.

A few months ago, an analysis of ten male participants in the same study showed that viral load in semen rapidly rebounds to infectious levels after interrupting HIV treatment. Increases in viral load in both blood and semen were observed within two weeks and after four weeks, all ten participants had detectable virus in their semen.


Reference

Lelièvre JD & Hocqueloux L. Unintended HIV-1 Transmission to a Sex Partner in a Study of a Therapeutic Vaccine Candidate. Journal of Infectious Diseases, online ahead of print, 16 February 2019.

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Healthy High-Fiber Breakfast Ideas VOL-1

Healthy High-Fiber Breakfast Ideas That Will Keep You Full

 

 

DoctorHQ – Series  Vol: 1

 

By now it’s not news that breakfast does a body good, replenishing energy, kick-starting your insulin response, and even preventing heart disease.

But when life throws too much onto our plates, the most important meal of the day often also becomes the most ignored. And even those who do squeeze in a morning meal—whether it’s toting processed granola bars to work or school; grabbing a greasy bacon, egg, and cheese on their commute; or dipping into the box of donuts someone’s brought to the office—are missing one key ingredient: fiber.

Less than 3 percent of Americans meet the recommended daily intake of 25 to 30 grams of this essential digestion-promoting, cholesterol-lowering nutrient! Make your breakfast an easy opportunity to change that, with these 32 quick recipes that pack in 5 grams or more per serving.

Sweet Oats, Bowls, and Other Grains

1. Chia Seed Breakfast Bowl

chia seed
chia seed

Superfood chia gives this breakfast concoction its slow-digesting carbohydrates, and as a result, its incredible staying power. Take two minutes out to mix it up the night before so that you can wake up to a meal that will fuel you with healthy fats, 12 percent of your daily value of calcium, and of course, plenty of fiber.

Fiber per serving: 10 grams


Ingredients

    ¼ cup chia seeds
    1.5 - 2 cups milk of your choice (soy, almond, coconut, hemp, etc.)
    2 tablespoons pure maple syrup
    1 teaspoon vanilla

Instructions

    Mix all ingredients in a bowl, whisk well to prevent clumping. Or blend all ingredients together using a high-speed blender.
    Note: For a thicker pudding, decrease amount of milk used.
    Store in an air-tight container and refrigerate overnight.
    Serve with toppings of your choice! Mangos, bananas, berries, kiwi, almonds, walnuts, cinnamon, maple syrup, pineapple, etc.



It takes 2 minutes to mix all the ingredients together, place in an air-tight container and refrigerate overnight.
 Wake up and breakfast is ready!  You can also portion out into smaller containers for a great grab and go breakfast on the run!

This recipe makes 2 servings.  Each serving contains:

4564 mg Omega 3 and 1504 mg Omega 6

10 grams of fiber

12% daily value of calcium (from chia seeds alone)

250-300 calories and 10-15 grams of protein depending on the type of milk you use

I used a combination of soy milk and canned whole coconut milk to create a more custard-like quality…similar to Greek yogurt.
If you don’t like the tapioca consistency of chia seed pudding, blend it in a high-speed blender until creamy (that’s how I made this bowl!).

chia seed breakfast bowl 
Author: BeginWithinNutrition

2. Chocolate Strawberry Oatmeal with Kale

Well aware of kale’s numerous health benefits, but still can’t stomach the stuff? A spoonful of cocoa helps this fiber-filled, vitamin-rich leafy green go down, along with some other ingredients to lend additional bulk to the meal, including rolled oats, a smattering of sliced fruit, and nut butter for that stick-to-your-ribs satiety. The combo may sound unlikely, but it’s also way too intriguing not to try.

Fiber per serving: 10 plus grams

3. Delicious Mocha Oatmeal

oatmeal
oatmeal

 

 

 

Kick up your old oatmeal with instant coffee, cholesterol-lowering grains, plus fibrous banana and walnuts to fill you up. Factor in the 17 grams of protein also packed into one serving (thanks to the nuts and milk), and you can bid that mid-morning energy crash goodbye.

Fiber per serving: 8.8 grams

4. Seedy Peanut Butter Toast

As quickly assembled as peanut butter and jelly, this toast is edible proof that getting your daily dose of fiber requires much less effort than many think. Just replace the fruit spread with a sprinkle of chia and flax. Not only will the simple switch jump-start your digestion, but the seeds come with B-vitamins, calcium, and fatty acids for blood, bone, and heart health. PB&J has got nothing on this!

Fiber per serving (1 teaspoon each chia and flax, 2 teaspoons peanut butter): 12 grams

5. Vanilla and Overnight Oats

If figs don’t feature in your regular grocery rotation (and for more then 98 percent of Americans, they don’t), this recipe may just change that. Just two pieces of the fresh fruit, along with a few anti-inflammatory dates per serving amp up this overnight, vanilla-kissed oatmeal to a naturally sweet and doughy bowl crammed with calcium, potassium, antioxidants, and fiber.

Fiber per serving: 15 grams

6. Quick and Easy Sweet Brown Rice Breakfast Bowl

Don’t limit brown rice to dinnertime menus! There’s no reason this nutty, fiber-riffic grain can’t take center stage in your breakfast too. It’s sweetened with maple syrup (hey, antioxidants!), paired with date and apple chunks, and spiced up with cinnamon for a gluten-free bowl that’s as healthy as oatmeal and as yummy as rice pudding.

Fiber per serving: 7.8 grams

7. Strawberry and Quinoa Parfait

Quinoa
Quinoa

Boasting all the essential amino acids, quinoa on its own would give this meal an impressive protein and fiber profile. Alternate layers of seeds with cloudy pillows of Greek yogurt and a sprinkle of walnuts for some hunger-quelling fat, and you’ve elevated this heart-healthy breakfast to indisputable superfood status.

Fiber per serving: 9 grams

8. Blueberry Fiber Starter

Composed of fruit, seeds, and almond milk, this Paleo-friendly breakfast may be free of gluten, dairy, soy, but it’s positively loaded with fiber and fatty acids. Don’t let the high fat content deter you: Now that we know that lipids can boost brain health, starting the day with them is a smart choice.

Fiber per serving: 21.6 grams

Savory

9. Five Minute Breakfast Burrito

In the time it would take to nuke a frozen burrito in the microwave, create your own from scratch with fresh ingredients. Eggs, salsa, spinach, and cheddar cozy up inside a tortilla (choose a high-fiber variety) for a filling wrap that’s not only kind to your digestive system, but also to your blood pressure, thanks to the potassium from the veggies.

Fiber per serving: 12.5 grams

10. Breakfast Lentils

If beans on toast can be a breakfast item, why not lentils? This recipe sautés the low-glycemic, iron-, and magnesium-boasting legumes with fragrant accompaniments. including soy sauce and immunity-protecting garlic. Pile them onto slices of whole wheat bread for a long-lasting punch.

Fiber per serving: 15 grams

 

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Keytruda combination(Inlyta) found to reduce risk of death in RCC – Renal Cell Carcinoma

A combination of MSD’s anti-PD-1 therapy Keytruda (pembrolizumab) and Pfizer’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor Inlyta (axitinib) has been found to reduce risk of death by nearly half compared to sunitinib as first-line treatment for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

The results are taken from the pivotal Phase III KEYNOTE-426 trial, and show that the combination is the first regimen to significantly improve overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and objective response rate (ORR) compared to sunitinib.

The dual primary endpoints of the study were OS and PFS; key secondary endpoints include ORR, safety, duration of response, PFS at 12, 18 and 24 months and OS at 12, 18 and 24 months.

Findings from the first interim analysis show that the drug combination cut the risk of death by 47%, and that the ORR was 59.3% for patients who received the combination.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has already granted priority review for a supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) for Keytruda in combination with Inlyta for the first-line treatment of patients with advanced RCC, with a set target action date of June 20, 2019.

Inlyta added to Keytruda

“Historically, patients with advanced RCC have faced five-year survival rates of less than 10 percent. Given the aggressive nature of this disease and the poor long-term prognosis, these new survival data with Keytruda in combination with axitinib from KEYNOTE-426 offer the potential of a new treatment option for patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma,” said Dr Thomas Powles, lead investigator for KEYNOTE-426, professor of genitourinary oncology, lead for Solid Tumour Research at Barts Cancer Institute, and director of Barts Cancer Centre.

Renal cell carcinoma is by far the most common type of kidney cancer; about nine out of ten kidney cancers are RCCs and the disease is about twice as common in men as in women.

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High Blood Pressure : Catapres (Clonidine)

HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE: SERIES II

 

About High blood pressure

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is called diastolic pressure. Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers. Usually the systolic number comes before or above the diastolic number. A reading of119/79 or lower is normal blood pressure140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number is called prehypertension.

Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it.High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney failure.You can control high blood pressure through healthy lifestyle habits and taking medicines, if needed. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Are there other issues with high blood pressure medication?

It can be hard to predict which drugs will work for you, but we know some are less effective in older people or those of African Caribbean background. Most people will need more than one drug to control their blood pressure.

It is estimated that more than half of patients do not take their medications as prescribed. This contributes to poor blood pressure control and increased risk of stroke and heart attack.

Part of the problem is that with hypertension, the condition itself usually does not cause symptoms that remind you to take medications. Asking your doctor for once-a-day tablets and building it into your daily routine can help. A dosette box (pill box with compartments for each day, and times of the day if necessary) may help. You can get them at most pharmacies

Catapres (Clonidine)

Prescription only

Lowers blood pressure.

Catapres (Clonidine) is a good addition if you need more than one medicine to control your blood pressure, but it has a lot of side effects. You can’t miss doses.

UPSIDE:

  • Can be added to other blood pressure-lowering medicines if you need additional blood pressure control.
  • Available in a weekly patch for people that aren’t good at taking medicine by mouth.
  • Works in the brain, so it can help treat some nervous system and psychiatric conditions.
  • Under the brand name Kapvay, it’s used to treat ADHD in children and teenagers.

 

DOWNSIDE:

  • Has a lot of side effects compared to other blood pressure-lowering medicine because it works in the brain.
  • The pill form can make some people sleepy, dizzy, and have dry mouth.
  • You can’t miss doses. Stopping Clonidine suddenly can cause your blood pressure to go up suddenly, which raises the risk of heart attack and stroke.

 

USED FOR:

  • High blood pressure
  • ADHD
  • Hot flashes
  • Foot ulcer
  • Smoking cessation
  • Opioid withdrawal
  • Tic disorder

DOSAGE FORMS:

  • Pill
  • Extended release
  • Patch
PRICE:

Lowest price

$5.94

REVIEWS {👩🏻 👨🏻👨🏽 👨🏾👩🏿👩🏼👨🏼 👩 👩🏽 👩🏾 💬 }
💬 42%  said it’s  worth it
💬 33% said it     worked well
💬 35% said it’s   a big hassle
SIDE EFFECTS

17 possible side effects

  • Erythema / pruritis 26%
  • Dry mouth 25%
  • Drowsiness 12%
  • Localized vesiculation 7%
  • Fatigue 6%
  • Headache 5%
  • Allergic contact sensitization 5%
  • Hyperpigmentation 5%
  • Lethargy 3%
  • Sedation 3%
  • Edema 3%
  • Excoriation 3%
  • Burning 3%
  • Insomnia 2%
  • Dizziness 2%
  • Impotence/sexual dysfunction 2%
  • Dry throat 2%
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High Blood Pressure: Norvasc (Amlodipine)

HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE: SERIES II

 

About High blood pressure

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is called diastolic pressure. Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers. Usually the systolic number comes before or above the diastolic number. A reading of119/79 or lower is normal blood pressure140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number is called prehypertension.

Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it.High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney failure.You can control high blood pressure through healthy lifestyle habits and taking medicines, if needed. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Are there other issues with high blood pressure medication?

It can be hard to predict which drugs will work for you, but we know some are less effective in older people or those of African Caribbean background. Most people will need more than one drug to control their blood pressure.

It is estimated that more than half of patients do not take their medications as prescribed. This contributes to poor blood pressure control and increased risk of stroke and heart attack.

Part of the problem is that with hypertension, the condition itself usually does not cause symptoms that remind you to take medications. Asking your doctor for once-a-day tablets and building it into your daily routine can help. A dosette box (pill box with compartments for each day, and times of the day if necessary) may help. You can get them at most pharmacies

Norvasc (Amlodipine)

Prescription only

Lowers blood pressure.

Norvasc (Amlodipine) works well to lower blood pressure and prevent chest pain. You can’t miss doses, and you might get persistent swelling.

Norvasc (Amlodipine) is a calcium channel blocker. It lowers blood pressure by slowing your heart rate and relaxing your blood vessels. Your heart gets more oxygen and doesn’t have to work as hard to pump, which can relieve chest pain.

  • Drug class: Cardiovascular
  • Rx status: Prescription only
  • Generic status: Lower-cost generic available (amlodipine)

UPSIDE:

  • A first-choice blood pressure treatment for many people.
  • Calcium channel blockers work especially well for African Americans to lower blood pressure.
  • Lowers the risk of heart attack and stroke.
  • Prevents heart-related chest pain (angina) if you take it regularly.
  • Each dose lasts longer than other calcium channel blockers, which keeps blood pressure consistent without big ups and downs.
  • Particularly good at lowering systolic blood pressure (the top number), so it’s a good option for older people who can commonly get high blood pressure only in the top number.

DOWNSIDE:

  • Calcium channel blockers can cause swelling in your limbs. If this happens for you, it probably won’t get better over time, so talk to your doctor about alternatives if it bothers you.
  • Women are more likely to have side effects (especially swelling) from Amlodipine than men.
  • Some people might experience flushing with this medication.
  • You can’t miss doses. Stopping Amlodipine suddenly can cause your blood pressure to go up suddenly, which raises the risk of heart attack and stroke.
  • If you have severe heart disease, using Amlodipine might increase your risk of chest pain or heart attack during the time right after starting the medication or raising the dosage.
  • Might not be a good choice if you have liver disease.

 

USED FOR:

  • High blood pressure
  • Chest pain
  • Heart failure
  • Diabetic kidney disease
  • Kidney disease
  • Enlarged heart
  • Silent heart attack
  • Raynaud’s phenomenon

DOSAGE FORMS:

Pill
PRICE:

Lowest price

$4.00

Reviews {👩🏻 👨🏻👨🏽 👨🏾👩🏿👩🏼👨🏼 👩 👩🏽 👩🏾 💬 }
💬58% said it’s   worth it
💬50%said it      worked well
💬15%said it’s    a big hassle
SIDE EFFECTS
3 possible side effects
  • Fatigue 5%
  • Nausea 3%
  • Abdominal pain 2%
RISKS and  RISK FACTORS
  • Low blood pressure
    • Age 65 years or older
  • Heart attack
    • History of heart problems
  • Special dosing requirements
    • Liver disease
  • Foot and leg swelling (edema)
    • History of blood vessel disease
    • History of heart failure
    • History of kidney disease
    • Obesity
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High Blood Pressure: Zestril (lisinopril)

HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE: SERIES II

 

About High blood pressure

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is called diastolic pressure. Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers. Usually the systolic number comes before or above the diastolic number. A reading of119/79 or lower is normal blood pressure140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number is called prehypertension.

Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it.High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney failure.You can control high blood pressure through healthy lifestyle habits and taking medicines, if needed. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Are there other issues with high blood pressure medication?

It can be hard to predict which drugs will work for you, but we know some are less effective in older people or those of African Caribbean background. Most people will need more than one drug to control their blood pressure.

It is estimated that more than half of patients do not take their medications as prescribed. This contributes to poor blood pressure control and increased risk of stroke and heart attack.

Part of the problem is that with hypertension, the condition itself usually does not cause symptoms that remind you to take medications. Asking your doctor for once-a-day tablets and building it into your daily routine can help. A dosette box (pill box with compartments for each day, and times of the day if necessary) may help. You can get them at most pharmacies

Zestril (lisinopril)

Prescription only

Lowers blood pressure.

Zestril (lisinopril) is a good blood pressure-lowering medicine that protects kidney function.

UPSIDE:

  • A first-choice blood pressure treatment for many people.
  • Lowers the risk of heart attack and stroke.
  • Protects kidney function, which is especially useful for people with diabetes or mild-to-moderate kidney disease.
  • Recommended for anyone with heart failure since it lowers the risk of death and further damage to your heart.
  • Very cheap drug, and comes available as a liquid for children over 6 years of age.

 

 

DOWNSIDE:

  • Up to 10% of people can get a dry cough while using this medicine. It ranges from a mild tickle in the throat to a persistent hacking cough.
  • Requires a yearly blood test to see how the medicine is affecting your body.
  • Zestril (lisinopril) isn’t safe to use if you’re pregnant.
  • Doesn’t work as well in people of African descent, and can cause a greater chance of face, tongue, or lip swelling

 


 

USED FOR:

  • High blood pressure
  • Heart failure
  • Heart attack
  • Diabetic kidney disease
  • Diabetic vision loss prevention and treatment
  • Kidney disease

DOSAGE FORMS:

  • Pill
  • Liquid
PRICE:

Lowest price

$497.46

Lisinopril: Cardiac Uses and Mechanism

Lisinopril: Safe Dosing and Common Side Effects

Lisinopril:Precautions for Use

REVIEWS {👩🏻 👨🏻👨🏽 👨🏾👩🏿👩🏼👨🏼 👩 👩🏽 👩🏾 💬 }
💬 61% said it’s worth it
💬 51% said it worked well
💬 14% said it’s a big hassle
SIDE EFFECTS

1 possible side effects

  • Low blood pressure 5%

Risks and risk factors

  • Harm to fetus
    • Women of childbearing age
  • Cough
  • Swelling of face and head
    • African descent
  • High potassium
    • Current kidney problems
    • Medicines that increase potassium
    • Use of salt substitutes
  • Worsening kidney problems
    • History of kidney problems
  • Low blood pressure
    • Taking with alcohol
    • Taking other medicines that lower your blood pressure
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Cozaar (Losartan)

HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE: SERIES II

 

About High blood pressure

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is called diastolic pressure. Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers. Usually the systolic number comes before or above the diastolic number. A reading of119/79 or lower is normal blood pressure140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number is called prehypertension.

Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it.High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney failure.You can control high blood pressure through healthy lifestyle habits and taking medicines, if needed. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Are there other issues with high blood pressure medication?

It can be hard to predict which drugs will work for you, but we know some are less effective in older people or those of African Caribbean background. Most people will need more than one drug to control their blood pressure.

It is estimated that more than half of patients do not take their medications as prescribed. This contributes to poor blood pressure control and increased risk of stroke and heart attack.

Part of the problem is that with hypertension, the condition itself usually does not cause symptoms that remind you to take medications. Asking your doctor for once-a-day tablets and building it into your daily routine can help. A dosette box (pill box with compartments for each day, and times of the day if necessary) may help. You can get them at most pharmacies

Cozaar (Losartan)

Prescription only

Lowers blood pressure.

Cozaar (Losartan) is a good blood pressure-lowering medicine that protects kidney function like an ACE inhibitor, but with fewer side effects..

UPSIDE:

  • A first-choice blood pressure treatment for many people.
  • Lowers the risk of heart attack and stroke.
  • Similar to ACE inhibitors (like Lisinopril), with fewer side effects like cough and swelling.
  • Protects kidney function, which is especially useful for people with diabetes or mild-to-moderate kidney disease.
  • Recommended for anyone with heart failure since it lowers the risk of death and further damage to your heart.

 

DOWNSIDE:

  • Requires a yearly blood test to see how the medicine is affecting your body.
  • Not safe to use if you’re pregnant.

 


 

USED FOR:

  • High blood pressure
  • Diabetic kidney disease
  • Stroke prevention
  • High blood pressure with diabetes
  • Lower heart attack and stroke risk
  • Diabetes prevention
  • Diabetic kidney disease
  • Kidney disease
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Gout
  • Heart failure
  • High urine calcium
  • Enlarged heart
  • Atrial fibrillation prevention

DOSAGE FORMS:

  • Pill
PRICE:

Lowest price

$118.59

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💬 57% said it’s worth it
💬 48% said it worked well
💬 16% said it’s a big hassle
SIDE EFFECTS

4 possible side effects

 

  • Upper respiratory infection 8%
  • Dizziness  3%
  • Back pain 2%
  • Nasal congestion 2%

 

Risks and risk factors

  • Harm to fetus
    • Women of childbearing age
  • Liver damage
    • Concurrent liver disease
  • Heart problems due to high potassium
    • Current kidney problems
    • Medicine that increase potassium
    • Use of salt substitute
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